This Month's Headlines:


Editor's Letter

On July 2, 1863, surrounded by the shadow of night, several Union generals crowded in a small room. Their meeting would decide the pivotal outcome of the Battle of Gettysburg. Major General George Meade, commander of the Army of the Potomac, had been studying a map of the area that day, and agreed with the consensus – that the Union should stay and fight. The moment was historic, and so was the place. The tiny Leister farm which General Meade had selected as his headquarters at Gettysburg, was “little more than a hut” that housed in 1863 a widow and several of her children. Unfortunately for its owner, the small house proved to be located in both an ideal and unlucky position – found in a swale behind the center of the Union defensive line.   Read More >

The Leister Farm: History's Smallest Headquarters

On July 2, 1863, surrounded by the shadow of night, several Union generals crowded in a small room. Their meeting would decide the pivotal outcome of the Battle of Gettysburg. Major General George Meade, commander of the Army of the Potomac, had been studying a map of the area that day, and agreed with the consensus – that the Union should stay and fight. The moment was historic, and so was the place. The tiny Leister farm which General Meade had selected as his headquarters at Gettysburg, was “little more than a hut” that housed in 1863 a widow and several of her children. Unfortunately for its owner, the small house proved to be located in both an ideal and unlucky position – found in a swale behind the center of the Union defensive line.  Read More >

Kilwin's: The Tradition Continues

With the approach of summer, the lure of ice cream is especially strong after exploring the town and battlefield of Gettysburg. At Kilwin’s Chocolates Fudge & Ice Cream, at 37 Steinwehr Avenue, a long standing tradition of wonderful sweet things is always welcome. Read More >

I Remember Gettysburg

In the early summer of 1863, the town of Gettysburg was inundated with the horrors of war that few civilians have witnessed in American history. Here are the stories of some of those who lived through those execrable days when the fulcrum of the outcome of war rested upon what would happen in the small crossroads town:   Read More >

Francis Barlow: The Boy General

On Gettysburg’s explosive first day, men clad in blue and gray clashed on the fields west of town on the morning of July 1, 1863. The Union – limited at first to the First Corps, supported by Buford’s Cavalry Division, had been fighting all morning against Heth’s Division of A.P. Hill’s Corps. By the afternoon, more than the weather was heating up. As Pender’s Division of Hill’s Corps joined Heth’s men in pressing the Union First Corps from the west, General Ewell’s Corps, coming from the north and east, threatened the Union flank from a different angle. With two much larger Confederate Corps threatening the single Union infantry corps, the men of the Federal’s First were glad to see another Union Corps – the Eleventh – double quick through the town to the north, past Gettysburg College, and take up their position in the valley behind them.            Read More >

The Barlow/Gordon Incident: Fact or Myth?

One of Gettysburg’s most inspiring stories tells of the desperate wounding of a Union general and a Confederate commander coming to his rescue.

The first part of the incident, according to one of the participants, took place just north of the town of Gettysburg on the afternoon of July 1, 1863:  Read More >

Recipes, Yesterday, & Today >


The Books

A Gettysburg Collection,
A Biographical Treasury


By Diana Loski

Diana Loski is the editor of The Gettysburg Experience magazine. For the Civil War enthusiasts, for the visitor passing through, or for the long-time Gettysburg resident, this book will capture the essence of this unique and wonderful, and sometimes tragic, place known to the world as the Borough of Gettysburg.

$12.00 plus $4.50 S&H

Books are available for purchase by calling (717)359-0776.

About Us

The Gettysburg Experience
magazine, a publication exploring the Gettysburg of yesterday and today. We offer an array of interesting articles – most of which have a direct relation to historic Gettysburg from the Colonial era through the turn of the 21st century, often with an emphasis on the famous battle that occurredin the summer of 1863.

The Gettysburg Experience also offers a comprehensive Events Calendar (for those who want to know what special happenings to attend when they visit – any time of the year), delicious recipes, Gettysburg trivia, profiles of people and area businesses.

Having served the Gettysburg area since 1997, The Gettysburg Experience now extends our magazine to a wider circulation of readers, offering a glimpse into one of America’s most fascinating towns. 
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